Binding a special key on HP Pavilion dv6 in Fedora 19

Background: My laptop (HP Pavilion dv6) has some special keys. These are probably useful in Windows, but my laptop came with FreeDOS and I have installed Linux on it. That still doesn’t take away the special keys.

Here is a graphic from the laptop user guide that explains the purpose of the various keys:

hp pavilion dv6 special keys

hp pavilion dv6 special keys

My intention was to use the key with the red highlighting. The manual says it opens the MediaSmart application. My purpose is better served, if it opens the File Manager. However, in openbox, it would need to be put in as a key binding. For this, I needed to know the signal that the particular key generates. As with most topics for configuration, I find ArchWiki to be very useful. Same case with extra keys.

So, on a virtual terminal, on running showkey, I see the following on the screen:

Aug 27 10:47:20 nandan kernel: [ 2678.203231] atkbd serio0: Unknown key pressed (translated set 2, code 0xc2 on isa0060/serio0).
Aug 27 10:47:20 nandan kernel: [ 2678.205029] atkbd serio0: Use ‘setkeycodes e042 ‘ to make it known.
Aug 27 10:47:20 nandan kernel: [ 2678.272592] atkbd serio0: Unknown key released (translated set 2, code 0xc2 on isa0060/serio0).
Aug 27 10:47:20 nandan kernel: [ 2678.274945] atkbd serio0: Use ‘setkeycodes e042 ‘ to make it known.

This means my system does know the signal coming from the keyboard, but it has not been assigned to do anything useful.

I need the key to open a File Manager. This would be useful only in my GUI login session. In other words, it would be related to the X-Windows server configuration. I need to be careful in that I must not assign the signal to a keycode already assigned to another operation/command. Once again, Archwiki tells us how to understand this.

Running the command xmodmap -pke, I get:

keycode 8 =
keycode 9 = Escape NoSymbol Escape
keycode 10 = 1 exclam 1 exclam
keycode 11 = 2 at 2 at
keycode 12 = 3 numbersign 3 numbersign
keycode 13 = 4 dollar 4 dollar
keycode 14 = 5 percent 5 percent
keycode 15 = 6 asciicircum 6 asciicircum
keycode 16 = 7 ampersand 7 ampersand
keycode 17 = 8 asterisk 8 asterisk
keycode 18 = 9 parenleft 9 parenleft
keycode 19 = 0 parenright 0 parenright
keycode 20 = minus underscore minus underscore
keycode 21 = equal plus equal plus
keycode 22 = BackSpace BackSpace BackSpace BackSpace
keycode 23 = Tab ISO_Left_Tab Tab ISO_Left_Tab
keycode 24 = q Q q Q
keycode 25 = w W w W
keycode 26 = e E e E
keycode 27 = r R r R
keycode 28 = t T t T
keycode 29 = y Y y Y
keycode 30 = u U u U
keycode 31 = i I i I
keycode 32 = o O o O
keycode 33 = p P p P
keycode 34 = bracketleft braceleft bracketleft braceleft
keycode 35 = bracketright braceright bracketright braceright
keycode 36 = Return NoSymbol Return
keycode 37 = Control_L NoSymbol Control_L
keycode 38 = a A a A
keycode 39 = s S s S
keycode 40 = d D d D
keycode 41 = f F f F
keycode 42 = g G g G
keycode 43 = h H h H
keycode 44 = j J j J
keycode 45 = k K k K
keycode 46 = l L l L
keycode 47 = semicolon colon semicolon colon
keycode 48 = apostrophe quotedbl apostrophe quotedbl
keycode 49 = grave asciitilde grave asciitilde
keycode 50 = Shift_L NoSymbol Shift_L
keycode 51 = backslash bar backslash bar
keycode 52 = z Z z Z
keycode 53 = x X x X
keycode 54 = c C c C
keycode 55 = v V v V
keycode 56 = b B b B
keycode 57 = n N n N
keycode 58 = m M m M
keycode 59 = comma less comma less
keycode 60 = period greater period greater
keycode 61 = slash question slash question
keycode 62 = Shift_R NoSymbol Shift_R
keycode 63 = KP_Multiply KP_Multiply KP_Multiply KP_Multiply KP_Multiply KP_Multiply XF86ClearGrab
keycode 64 = Alt_L Meta_L Alt_L Meta_L
keycode 65 = space NoSymbol space
keycode 66 = Caps_Lock NoSymbol Caps_Lock
keycode 67 = F1 F1 F1 F1 F1 F1 XF86Switch_VT_1
keycode 68 = F2 F2 F2 F2 F2 F2 XF86Switch_VT_2
keycode 69 = F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 F3 XF86Switch_VT_3
keycode 70 = F4 F4 F4 F4 F4 F4 XF86Switch_VT_4
keycode 71 = F5 F5 F5 F5 F5 F5 XF86Switch_VT_5
keycode 72 = F6 F6 F6 F6 F6 F6 XF86Switch_VT_6
keycode 73 = F7 F7 F7 F7 F7 F7 XF86Switch_VT_7
keycode 74 = F8 F8 F8 F8 F8 F8 XF86Switch_VT_8
keycode 75 = F9 F9 F9 F9 F9 F9 XF86Switch_VT_9
keycode 76 = F10 F10 F10 F10 F10 F10 XF86Switch_VT_10
keycode 77 = Num_Lock NoSymbol Num_Lock
keycode 78 = Scroll_Lock NoSymbol Scroll_Lock
keycode 79 = KP_Home KP_7 KP_Home KP_7
keycode 80 = KP_Up KP_8 KP_Up KP_8
keycode 81 = KP_Prior KP_9 KP_Prior KP_9
keycode 82 = KP_Subtract KP_Subtract KP_Subtract KP_Subtract KP_Subtract KP_Subtract XF86Prev_VMode
keycode 83 = KP_Left KP_4 KP_Left KP_4
keycode 84 = KP_Begin KP_5 KP_Begin KP_5
keycode 85 = KP_Right KP_6 KP_Right KP_6
keycode 86 = KP_Add KP_Add KP_Add KP_Add KP_Add KP_Add XF86Next_VMode
keycode 87 = KP_End KP_1 KP_End KP_1
keycode 88 = KP_Down KP_2 KP_Down KP_2
keycode 89 = KP_Next KP_3 KP_Next KP_3
keycode 90 = KP_Insert KP_0 KP_Insert KP_0
keycode 91 = KP_Delete KP_Decimal KP_Delete KP_Decimal
keycode 92 = ISO_Level3_Shift NoSymbol ISO_Level3_Shift
keycode 93 =
keycode 94 = less greater less greater bar brokenbar bar
keycode 95 = F11 F11 F11 F11 F11 F11 XF86Switch_VT_11
keycode 96 = F12 F12 F12 F12 F12 F12 XF86Switch_VT_12
keycode 97 =
keycode 98 = Katakana NoSymbol Katakana
keycode 99 = Hiragana NoSymbol Hiragana
keycode 100 = Henkan_Mode NoSymbol Henkan_Mode
keycode 101 = Hiragana_Katakana NoSymbol Hiragana_Katakana
keycode 102 = Muhenkan NoSymbol Muhenkan
keycode 103 =
keycode 104 = KP_Enter NoSymbol KP_Enter
keycode 105 = Control_R NoSymbol Control_R
keycode 106 = KP_Divide KP_Divide KP_Divide KP_Divide KP_Divide KP_Divide XF86Ungrab
keycode 107 = Print Sys_Req Print Sys_Req
keycode 108 = Alt_R Meta_R Alt_R Meta_R
keycode 109 = Linefeed NoSymbol Linefeed
keycode 110 = Home NoSymbol Home
keycode 111 = Up NoSymbol Up
keycode 112 = Prior NoSymbol Prior
keycode 113 = Left NoSymbol Left
keycode 114 = Right NoSymbol Right
keycode 115 = End NoSymbol End
keycode 116 = Down NoSymbol Down
keycode 117 = Next NoSymbol Next
keycode 118 = Insert NoSymbol Insert
keycode 119 = Delete NoSymbol Delete
keycode 120 =
keycode 121 = XF86AudioMute NoSymbol XF86AudioMute
keycode 122 = XF86AudioLowerVolume NoSymbol XF86AudioLowerVolume
keycode 123 = XF86AudioRaiseVolume NoSymbol XF86AudioRaiseVolume
keycode 124 = XF86PowerOff NoSymbol XF86PowerOff
keycode 125 = KP_Equal NoSymbol KP_Equal
keycode 126 = plusminus NoSymbol plusminus
keycode 127 = Pause Break Pause Break
keycode 128 = XF86LaunchA NoSymbol XF86LaunchA
keycode 129 = KP_Decimal KP_Decimal KP_Decimal KP_Decimal
keycode 130 = Hangul NoSymbol Hangul
keycode 131 = Hangul_Hanja NoSymbol Hangul_Hanja
keycode 132 =
keycode 133 = Super_L NoSymbol Super_L
keycode 134 = Super_R NoSymbol Super_R
keycode 135 = Menu NoSymbol Menu
keycode 136 = Cancel NoSymbol Cancel
keycode 137 = Redo NoSymbol Redo
keycode 138 = SunProps NoSymbol SunProps
keycode 139 = Undo NoSymbol Undo
keycode 140 = XF86Terminal NoSymbol XF86Terminal
keycode 141 = XF86Copy NoSymbol XF86Copy
keycode 142 = XF86Open NoSymbol XF86Open
keycode 143 = XF86Paste NoSymbol XF86Paste
keycode 144 = Find NoSymbol Find
keycode 145 = XF86Cut NoSymbol XF86Cut
keycode 146 = Help NoSymbol Help
keycode 147 = XF86MenuKB NoSymbol XF86MenuKB
keycode 148 = XF86Calculator NoSymbol XF86Calculator
keycode 149 =
keycode 150 = XF86Sleep NoSymbol XF86Sleep
keycode 151 = XF86WakeUp NoSymbol XF86WakeUp
keycode 152 = XF86Explorer NoSymbol XF86Explorer
keycode 153 = XF86Send NoSymbol XF86Send
keycode 154 =
keycode 155 = XF86Mail NoSymbol XF86Mail
keycode 156 = XF86Launch1 NoSymbol XF86Launch1
keycode 157 = XF86Launch2 NoSymbol XF86Launch2
keycode 158 = XF86WWW NoSymbol XF86WWW
keycode 159 = XF86DOS NoSymbol XF86DOS
keycode 160 = XF86ScreenSaver NoSymbol XF86ScreenSaver
keycode 161 =
keycode 162 = XF86RotateWindows NoSymbol XF86RotateWindows
keycode 163 = XF86Mail NoSymbol XF86Mail
keycode 164 = XF86Favorites NoSymbol XF86Favorites
keycode 165 = XF86MyComputer NoSymbol XF86MyComputer
keycode 166 = XF86Back NoSymbol XF86Back
keycode 167 = XF86Forward NoSymbol XF86Forward
keycode 168 =
keycode 169 = XF86Eject NoSymbol XF86Eject
keycode 170 = XF86ScreenSaver NoSymbol XF86ScreenSaver
keycode 171 = XF86AudioNext NoSymbol XF86AudioNext
keycode 172 = XF86WWW NoSymbol XF86WWW
keycode 173 = XF86AudioPrev NoSymbol XF86AudioPrev
keycode 174 = XF86AudioStop XF86Eject XF86AudioStop XF86Eject
keycode 175 = XF86AudioRecord NoSymbol XF86AudioRecord
keycode 176 = XF86AudioRewind NoSymbol XF86AudioRewind
keycode 177 = XF86Phone NoSymbol XF86Phone
keycode 178 =
keycode 179 = XF86Tools NoSymbol XF86Tools
keycode 180 = XF86HomePage NoSymbol XF86HomePage
keycode 181 = XF86Reload NoSymbol XF86Reload
keycode 182 = XF86Close NoSymbol XF86Close
keycode 183 =
keycode 184 =
keycode 185 = XF86ScrollUp NoSymbol XF86ScrollUp
keycode 186 = XF86ScrollDown NoSymbol XF86ScrollDown
keycode 187 = parenleft NoSymbol parenleft
keycode 188 = parenright NoSymbol parenright
keycode 189 = XF86New NoSymbol XF86New
keycode 190 = Redo NoSymbol Redo
keycode 191 = XF86Tools NoSymbol XF86Tools
keycode 192 = XF86Launch5 NoSymbol XF86Launch5
keycode 193 = XF86Launch6 NoSymbol XF86Launch6
keycode 194 = XF86Launch7 NoSymbol XF86Launch7
keycode 195 = XF86Launch8 NoSymbol XF86Launch8
keycode 196 = XF86Launch9 NoSymbol XF86Launch9
keycode 197 =
keycode 198 =
keycode 199 = XF86TouchpadToggle NoSymbol XF86TouchpadToggle
keycode 200 = XF86TouchpadOn NoSymbol XF86TouchpadOn
keycode 201 = XF86TouchpadOff NoSymbol XF86TouchpadOff
keycode 202 =
keycode 203 = Mode_switch NoSymbol Mode_switch
keycode 204 = NoSymbol Alt_L NoSymbol Alt_L
keycode 205 = NoSymbol Meta_L NoSymbol Meta_L
keycode 206 = NoSymbol Super_L NoSymbol Super_L
keycode 207 = NoSymbol Hyper_L NoSymbol Hyper_L
keycode 208 = XF86AudioPlay NoSymbol XF86AudioPlay
keycode 209 = XF86AudioPause NoSymbol XF86AudioPause
keycode 210 = XF86Launch3 NoSymbol XF86Launch3
keycode 211 = XF86Launch4 NoSymbol XF86Launch4
keycode 212 = XF86LaunchB NoSymbol XF86LaunchB
keycode 213 = XF86Suspend NoSymbol XF86Suspend
keycode 214 = XF86Close NoSymbol XF86Close
keycode 215 = XF86AudioPlay NoSymbol XF86AudioPlay
keycode 216 = XF86AudioForward NoSymbol XF86AudioForward
keycode 217 =
keycode 218 = Print NoSymbol Print
keycode 219 =
keycode 220 = XF86WebCam NoSymbol XF86WebCam
keycode 221 =
keycode 222 =
keycode 223 = XF86Mail NoSymbol XF86Mail
keycode 224 = XF86Messenger NoSymbol XF86Messenger
keycode 225 = XF86Search NoSymbol XF86Search
keycode 226 = XF86Go NoSymbol XF86Go
keycode 227 = XF86Finance NoSymbol XF86Finance
keycode 228 = XF86Game NoSymbol XF86Game
keycode 229 = XF86Shop NoSymbol XF86Shop
keycode 230 =
keycode 231 = Cancel NoSymbol Cancel
keycode 232 = XF86MonBrightnessDown NoSymbol XF86MonBrightnessDown
keycode 233 = XF86MonBrightnessUp NoSymbol XF86MonBrightnessUp
keycode 234 = XF86AudioMedia NoSymbol XF86AudioMedia
keycode 235 = XF86Display NoSymbol XF86Display
keycode 236 = XF86KbdLightOnOff NoSymbol XF86KbdLightOnOff
keycode 237 = XF86KbdBrightnessDown NoSymbol XF86KbdBrightnessDown
keycode 238 = XF86KbdBrightnessUp NoSymbol XF86KbdBrightnessUp
keycode 239 = XF86Send NoSymbol XF86Send
keycode 240 = XF86Reply NoSymbol XF86Reply
keycode 241 = XF86MailForward NoSymbol XF86MailForward
keycode 242 = XF86Save NoSymbol XF86Save
keycode 243 = XF86Documents NoSymbol XF86Documents
keycode 244 = XF86Battery NoSymbol XF86Battery
keycode 245 = XF86Bluetooth NoSymbol XF86Bluetooth
keycode 246 = XF86WLAN NoSymbol XF86WLAN
keycode 247 =
keycode 248 =
keycode 249 =
keycode 250 =
keycode 251 =
keycode 252 =
keycode 253 =
keycode 254 =
keycode 255 =

I chose keycode 120 seeing it was unused. But there was enough noise on the internet about how/when to set the keycode in the boot process. Looking around on the internet, I found this solution on Fedora Forum.

Adapting from the file shown in that post, I created my service file:

/etc/systemd/system/setmykeys.service

[Unit]
Description=Set my keycodes for special HP key
After=systemd-user-sessions.service

[Service]
Type=oneshot
RemainAfterExit=True
ExecStart=/bin/setkeycodes c2 120

[Install]
WantedBy=graphical.target

After this, the service needs to be enabled:

[nandan ~]# systemctl enable setmykeys.service

On rebooting the system, on a virtual terminal, I saw that the showkey command no longer generated the “unknown key” message, but showed keycode 120 being understood.

Here’s where it got a bit weird (my lack of understanding is really apparent now). Running the xev program after graphical login, I see the following output:

KeyRelease event, serial 48, synthetic NO, window 0x3a00001,
root 0×81, subw 0×0, time 4574043, (1220,71), root:(1224,124),
state 0×0, keycode 128 (keysym 0x1008ff4a, XF86LaunchA), same_screen YES,
XLookupString gives 0 bytes:
XFilterEvent returns: False

Essentially, it sees a different keycode than the virtual terminal. Openbox runs as a client of the X-Windows server, so I must honour the keycode detected under X-Windows (my guess). Openbox needs a hexadecimal code equivalent of the decimal 128, in order for the binding to work. I used the in-built calculator (MATE Calculator) in Programming mode to do the conversion. So decimal 128 turns out to be hexadecimal 80. In the file ~/.config/openbox/rc.xml, add the following within the block.


<keybind key=”0×80″>
   <action name=”Execute”>
      <execute>/usr/bin/dolphin</execute>
   </action>
</keybind>

Right-click on the openbox desktop, click on Reconfigure and the new shortcut should be working.

Points of confusion in a Fedora 19 installer

For those people that follow development in the Fedora Linux distribution, version 18 introduced some particularly drastic changes in the installer – anaconda. Some people have gone to the extent of calling it “the worst”. I, for one, don’t seem to share such an extreme view. But the installer is a bit confusing even for some people that have been comfortable with anaconda installer from before the “Enterprise” tag came along (including me).

Here is the set of things that could have been better, in my opinion. The opinions are in the context of a Fedora 19 install in a multi-boot set-up. The current set-up is as follows:

Virtual machine with 30 GB hard disk (/dev/vda) space and 1 GB RAM.
/dev/vda1 for /boot
Logical volumes for
/ of Fedora using ext3
/ of RHEL using ext3
/ of SUSE using ext3
/home common to all using ext3
/data common to all using ext3
swap common to all

Booting of all three distributions will be handled by GRUB2 installed by Fedora 19.

So, here are the screens of the installer that may have some comments/suggestions:

1: Language

Installer language

Installer language

Most distributions and older versions of anaconda have or used to have a text box for testing the keyboard. While nothing on the screen suggests that, old-timers tend to mistake the text box and face a dilemma when the language list becomes empty.

2: Network

Network settings

Network settings

The only post-install surprise (for me, at least) was the location of saving hostname (/etc/hostname). It should not have been a surprise, though. Both SUSE and Ubuntu have that as the file for setting the hostname.

3: Initial install options list

Initial install summary

Initial install summary

I like the idea of an install summary. It reminds me of the SUSE installer; all of the installation options summarized neatly in one page. Fedora could do more to make the install summary more comprehensive.

4: Time zone and NTP

Time zone and NTP

Time zone and NTP

This screen is pretty standard, but the image mapping for India could do a little tweaking. You really have to know where Kolkata is, in order to select it with the mouse. Click anywhere else within India, it selects Colombo, Kathmandu and some place in Russia, but not Kolkata.

5: Software

Software selection

Software selection

This screen has a much better option in Basic Desktop that I don’t recollect being there in Fedora 18. We can select multiple desktops that we prefer. Although, package-level selections is still not possible. I used to like that feature, but am okay with this too.

6. Partitioning

Fedora 19 installer partitioning initial screen

Fedora 19 installer partitioning initial screen

Compare this screen from the one in Fedora 18 installer

Fedora 18 installer partitioning initial screen

Fedora 18 installer partitioning initial screen

The initial options list screen does say Automatic Partitioning selected. The problem is I remember only that while I see this screen. I assume that automatic partitioning will be the one performed, if I click “Done”. See the one in the Fedora 18 installer? It says Continue on the bottom-right. This was a bit more re-assuring that there are more selection steps where I may get to see my pre-created mount points. I was tempted to abort the install at this point.

6a. Boot disk list

Disk list and bootloader install location

Disk list and bootloader install location

This screen came up on clicking the blue link at the bottom-left corner of the previous screen.

6b. Custom partitioning

Custom partitioning type selection

Custom partitioning type selection

It feels much better at this screen after seeing the custom partitioning button.

6c. Custom partitioning initial appearance

Custom partitioning with existing mount points hidden

Custom partitioning with existing mount points hidden

But where are my pre-created mount points? This screen was a bit confusing when I first saw it in Fedora 18 installer. I believe the old anaconda installer used to do this much better. Show the whole disk layout at one stroke. With correctly set and displayed labels, I could get the complete picture of the designated use of each partition or logical volume. Now, I am trying to read a treasure map.

6d. Custom partitioning initial appearance

Custom partitioning: Unhiding pre-created mount points

Custom partitioning: Unhiding pre-created mount points

One seeing this arrangement, I realize that anaconda is investigating /etc/fstab of each root filesystem it finds. But still, the old style was better. If it ain’t broke…

6e. Assigning mount points for existing filesystems and swap area

Re-assigning existing filesystems and swap area

Re-assigning existing filesystems and swap area

It is a bit confusing to figure out the sequence (numbered for reader’s benefit) to follow for re-assigning a mount point for a pre-created filesystem or swap area. Needless to say, the old anaconda installer did this job much better.

6f. Confirm filesystem formatting

Confirmation for filesystem formatting

Confirmation for filesystem formatting

This screen is pretty standard and good to have, just in case someone selects some filesystem to be re-formatted when it was not meant to be.

7. Installer final summary

Installer final summary

Installer final summary

Like I said in the initial install summary, I like this screen that summarizes the install options. It could use more information (in my opinion).

8. Install progress, root password, users

Install progress, root password, users

Install progress, root password, users

This looks inspired from Ubuntu, with some non-critical steps being performed during the install of packages. Nevertheless, it is a good idea and saves some time.

8a. Double-done dilemma

Double-done dilemma

Double-done dilemma

If you miss the screen bottom caution about a password that is too simple, you would be confused at this stage as well. I would much rather ask a direct question and get a confirmation from the user. If the button still says Done, I assume it may be showing the same screen while processing my input.

9. Time to reboot

Reboot

Reboot

Nothing to say, other than your prayers!

I think the installer is a lot better for those who have an empty hard disk. But I never seem to do that on my system. I guess I will have to try out the Fedora 20 installer to see if some things got fixed (or new things got broken!).

---End of article---

Adding a Windows printer to Fedora 19

For the last two releases, the Fedora installer (anakonda) has sported a drastically different, and somewhat challenging interface. Although, I must admit the experience in Fedora 19 has somewhat improved for package selection; it still needs the ability to customize package selection. Those saying custom package selection can be easily done with kickstart, are forgetting one simple fact – the purpose of kickstart. Kickstart is for automated deployment; the installer’s deficiency is not something a deployment tool should try to fulfil.

Nevertheless, this post is about adding a Windows printer to your Fedora system. First off, I selected Basic Desktop in the basic selection screen and then proceeded to add every desktop I could understand (except Sugar). Right now, I am composing this post from the Mate Desktop (thanks to whoever returned good old GNOME to us). But the tried-and-tested printer configuration utility (system-config-printer) was missing.

Default install of Fedora is missing printer configuration utility

Default install of Fedora is missing printer configuration utility

So, we need to add that utility. I used Yum Extender since the default in GNOME3 – gpk-application is woefully inadequate to do anything. I must say the KDE appilcation – apper also looked quite capable.

Yum Extender is a GUI front-end for yum software management utility

Yum Extender is a GUI front-end for yum software management utility

We are first prompted for authentication for elevated privileges. In my case, I had added my normal user account to be made an administrator. This means authentication to my account is enough to elevate privileges.

Yum Extender works with administrator-level privileges

Yum Extender works with administrator-level privileges

For installing the printer configuration utility, I searched for the term printer, selected the system-config-printer and clicked on apply. It asked for another confirmation, proceeded to download and install the package. So far so good.

Package selection in yumex

Package selection in yumex

Confirmation for package install

Confirmation for package install

yumex package install progress

yumex package install progress

yumex finished with package install

yumex finished with package install

Next step is to start the system-config-printer utility. This is an administration utility and will be under the System menu.

Starting system-config-printer

Starting system-config-printer

There is an easy way to add a new printer. Elevated privileges are required for multiple actions; be prepared to type the password a few times.

Adding new printer in system-config-printer

Adding new printer in system-config-printer

Screenshot authentication 1 system-config-printer

Screenshot authentication 1 system-config-printer

Screenshot authentication 2 system-config-printer

Screenshot authentication 2 system-config-printer

Screenshot missing windows printer option system-config-printer

Screenshot missing windows printer option system-config-printer

We need the samba-client package for this functionality (for some reason, older versions of Fedora used to install this by default). So, it is back to yumex to install this package. The steps are the same as above. On re-opening system-config-printer afterwards, we see the following screen:

Missing browse option system-config-printer

Missing browse option system-config-printer

While it does say that there is a missing package (pysmbc), strangely enough, the actual name of the package is python-smbc. Install this package in yumex and your system-config-printer should now be able to add a Windows printer.

Install package for browse option system-config-printer

Install package for browse option system-config-printer

Makes you wonder… we were able to do this without all these steps in the earlier versions!

Hello world!

Okay … for the nth time now. Here’s a reset of my site! Wish me luck!